Wordless Wednesday: Spring Blessings!

Wordless Wednesday: Spring Blessings!

However you celebrate the vernal equinox, may the many blessings of spring be with you today!

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Steampunk Frog Familiar

Steampunk Frog Familiar

Sometimes I get sick of the flat, bright rectangles of computer screens and book pages. When that happens, I go on crafting binges. My latest was inspired by the steampunk aesthetic and my recent spiritual work with the local flora and fauna of the Pacific Northwest.

This little guy was the result.

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Hipster Paganism

Hipster Paganism

I’m working hard to make Hipster Paganism a thing. Now that Pagan means Wiccan, and polytheist means Pagan, it’s only a matter of time before the People We’re Embarrassed By start calling themselves polytheists and recons. (It’s already starting.) I for one am embracing this endless cycle by bringing “Pagan” back… but in, like, an ironic way.

Read… Things Hipster Pagans Say

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Natural Theology: Polytheism Beyond the Pale » No Unsacred Place

Natural Theology: Polytheism Beyond the Pale » No Unsacred Place

In my latest post over on No Unsacred Place, I explore in more detail what it means to take an ecological approach to polytheism through the concept of “natural theology,” and the kinds of tough questions that this kind of inquiry might challenge us to ask:

“Ecology does not reject the hard sciences that came before it, but brings together and expands upon them. In this same way, natural polytheism draws on an ecological approach to theology to build upon the insights of hard polytheism, challenging us to deepen our relationships with the gods by asking more challenging questions about their relationships with us, with each other and with the natural world. …”

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Naming the Water: Human and Deity Identity from an Earth-Centered Perspective » No Unsacred Place

Naming the Water: Human and Deity Identity from an Earth-Centered Perspective » No Unsacred Place

In my latest post over on No Unsacred Place, I respond to Teo Bishop’s recent musings over at Bishop in the Grove, in which he contemplates hard polytheism and ancestor reverence, and the problematic issues of self-identity that might arise when we imagine our descendants worshipping us as gods:

“As a Pagan, my theology is rooted firmly in the earth. To me, the earth is sacred, and so the ecological truths that guide and shape life on this tiny blue marble are sacred truths. One of those truths is that identity is fluid. I can no more name the discrete entity that is “me” than I can name the water flowing in a river. From moment to moment, that identity changes. This was the insight of the Buddhists, too: we are not the same person from one second to the next, and reincarnation is less like viscous soul-substance getting sloshed from one meat-container into the next as it is like a flame passing from one wick to another. Is it the same flame? Yes… and then again, no. …”

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Nature as Living Story: Lectio Divina in the Natural World » Aontacht Magazine

Nature as Living Story: Lectio Divina in the Natural World » Aontacht Magazine

I’m a few days late with this announcement, but… exciting news everyone! The equinox issue of Aontacht Magazine is out, and it’s available free on the Druidic Dawn website.

This issue focuses on sacred spaces and sacred places, exploring this theme from a variety of perspectives. In the spirit of connecting to those lesser known and often overlooked spaces, my Wild Earth feature article revisits the practice of Lectio Divina as an opportunity to connect to the story of place in the natural world around us, engaging more deeply with its beings and spirits through observation, meditation, prayer and silent contemplation.

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