Holy Wild, News & Announcements

“What Makes a God,” A Myth Retold and More!

It's always nice to return home after a time away to discover you have a small pile of exciting news to share! This month, my poem "What Makes a God" appears in the most recent issue of Eternal Haunted Summer; my short story, "Yewberry," has been accepted for publication in the upcoming anthology of Pagan fiction, The Scribing Ibis; and I've received some wonderful support and link-love from the Wild Goose Festival and The Druid Network. Have a response or review of my work to share? Drop me a line on my contact page!

Holy Wild, peace

Catching the Wild Goose: Thanks and First Thoughts

After camping for four days straight at the Wild Goose Festival down in steamy, sunny North Carolina, my body almost rebells against the cushy bed, the hot shower and the dry, still air-conditioned air. I was getting used to the delicious feel of sweat and sun on my skin, sharing my home with spiders and trees, and waking to the sound of birds and snoring neighbors at dawn. I do believe camping is good for the soul. The Wild Goose Festival was a wonderful, welcoming and challenging event for Jeff and me, and we're both very grateful for the hard work and vision all of those staff members and volunteers who helped organize and run the festival this year.

Featured, Holy Wild, peace

Chasing the Wild Goose

I think there is power in the metaphor of the "Wild Goose" — An Geadh-Glas — the name in Celtic Christianity for the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is, after all, that Person of the Trinity which is the indwelling Spirit in all things, the immanence of the divine in the world itself. She is the balance and compliment to the transcendent God-the-Father. She is the fire of inspiration, the creative power of eros, the source and sustainer of community, the untamable wildness of hope. When we go on a "wild goose chase," we can feel that we're going in circles, spiraling silly around that which is elusive and mysterious. I can't help but think that my Celtic ancestors knew this about the Wild Goose, too — that those who follow her follow her into loneliness and sorrow, listening to her keening echoing over the solitude of the wilds.