Alison Leigh Lilly

• peace, poesis & wild holy earth •

Honoring the Past: Weaving Story from Memory

Pagans like to say, “What is remembered, lives.” Memory is re-membering, the act of giving life to the past through rituals of witness.

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October 20, 2016

Honoring the Past: Weaving Story from Memory

Pagans like to say, “What is remembered, lives.” Memory is re-membering, the act of giving life to the past through rituals of witness.

October 20, 2016 · 1 Comment

A Winter Homecoming

“It’s funny how family can bring you back to yourself because they know you so well and for so long, they treat you as if you were always just the same…”

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January 5, 2016

A Winter Homecoming

“It’s funny how family can bring you back to yourself because they know you so well and for so long, they treat you as if you were always just the same. Which is exactly what can drive you out of yourself, too, after a while. Because of course, you’re not.”

January 4, 2016 · 3 Comments

Tending to Your Joy: Pagan Lessons from Pixar’s Inside Out

Inside Out is a modern-day story of the shamanic journey into the Otherworld, a journey of both self-recovery and self-discovery. Does sadness have a purpose? Is it just a “negative” emotion that helps joy shine more brightly? That’s the question that this movie challenges us to explore, and the answer is more complex than you might expect!

July 7, 2015 · 3 Comments

How To Be An Evil Stepmother

I’ll never forget the day (nearly five years ago now) when The Oldest said, in a tone so like her mother’s snide dismissiveness, “If you didn’t want to be a stepmom, then you shouldn’t have decided to marry a man with kids.” It hurt. I felt blind-sided. I had no good answer. Instead, I sat for a second speechless and nonplussed, and then the conversation moved on.

I didn’t want to be a stepmom. I don’t know if anybody ever wants to be a stepmom. So why did I become one?

May 5, 2015 · 7 Comments

Daring to Dream: An Imbolc Family Adventure

It all started this past winter solstice when Jeff’s youngest daughter told us that she was going to be a dentist.

Actually, what she said was that she guessed she’d have to be a dentist, because everybody knows you can’t make a living as an artist.

Our heads kind of exploded at that point, so what happened next was a bit of a blur. I vaguely remember sitting her down at the kitchen table and asking her why this sudden about-face — she’d been talking about wanting to be an artist for the last several years which, for a nine-year-old, is almost a lifetime. I remember treading carefully, lest I inadvertently suggest that being a dentist wasn’t perfectly okay, too, if that’s what she really wanted. The world needs good dentists, after all. But what the world doesn’t need is a grumpy, jaded dentist who’s secretly always wanted to be an artist instead. That doesn’t end well for anyone.

February 4, 2014 · 3 Comments